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pad

A Soyuz/Fregat rocket shortly after installation on the launch pad on Feb. 18, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


launch

Soyuz ST-B lifts off with a sextuplet of OneWeb satellites on Feb. 27, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: Arianespace


flight

Soyuz MS-12 lifts off on March 14. Click to enlarge. Credit: NASA


 

Russian space activities in 2019

At the beginning of the year, the official Russian media promised 45 launches of rockets and missiles built by the Russian industry within the Roskosmos State Corporation in 2019. They included 32 orbital launch attempts with spacecraft. However, these numbers did not included test firings of submarine-based missiles. Around five or six military orbital launches were promised from Plesetsk and as many as 19 from Baikonur. In November 2018, the Russian emergency agency, MChS, also promised launches of six remote-sensing satellites, inclduing radar-carrying spacecraft before the end of 2019. The Ministry of Defense also promised during 2019 to deploy 31 Yars and Avangard launchers, four Tu-95 cruise-missile-carrying aircraft and the Knyaz Vladimir submarine with Bulava missiles.


For missions in 2018 click here

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assets

Russian orbital assets included 91 spacecraft as of May 14, 2019, according to Roskosmos. There is no independent confirmation of operational status of some satellites and others officially listed as part of the constellation are known to be inoperable or crippled.


The world's orbital launch attempts in 2019 (as of July 18, 2019 ):

-
Country
Launch date
Time of launch
Payload
Payload type
Launch vehicle
Launch site
Launch complex
Launch pad
Status
1
China
Jan. 10
17:11:04.838 UTC
Zhongxing-2D
Application / communications
Chang Zheng-3B/E
Xichang
2
-
Success
2
USA
Jan. 11
07:31:33.492 Pacific Time
Iridium-Next 8-1, Iridium-Next 8-2, Iridium-Next 8-3, Iridium-Next 8-4, Iridium-Next 8-5, Iridium-Next 8-6, Iridium-Next 8-7, Iridium-Next 8-8, Iridium-Next 8-9, Iridium-Next 8-10
Application / communications
Falcon-9 B1049
Vandenberg
SLC-4E
E
Success
3
Iran
Jan. 15
00:30 UTC
Payam
Experimental
Simorgh
Semnan
2
2
Failure
4
Japan
Jan. 18
05:00:20 UTC
RAPIS-1, RISESAT,
MicroDragon,
OrigamiSat-1,
NEXUS,
Aoba VELOX-4,
ALE-1
Experimental
Epsilon-4 S/N-4
Uchinoura
-
-
Success
5
USA
Jan. 19
11:10 a.m. Pacific Time
NROL-71/USA-290
Military / reconnaissance (?)
Delta-4 Heavy (D-382)
Vandenberg
SLC-6
-
Success
6
China
Jan. 21
13:42:20.984 Beijing Time
Jilin-1-01, Jilin-1-02, Lingque-1A, Xiaoxiang-1-03
Application / remote sensing
Chang Zheng-11 (Y6)
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
7
India
Jan. 24
23:37 India Standard Time
KalamSat-v2, Microsat-R
Application / remote sensing
PSLV-DL (C44)
Sriharikota
FLP
1
Success
8
Europe
Feb. 5
6:01:07 p.m. French Guiana time
HallasSat-4/Saudi Geostationary Satellite-1, GSAT-31
Application / communications
Ariane-5 (VA-247)
-
Success
9
Iran
Feb. 5
-
Dostij
Experimental
Simorgh (Safir-1B)
Semnan
1
1
Failure
10
Feb. 21
19:47 Moscow Time
Military / observation
6
Success
11
USA
Feb. 21
8:41 p.m. EST
Nasatara Satu (PSN-6), Beresheet lunar lander, S5
Application / communications, Planetary / Lunar, Military
Falcon-9 B1048
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
12
Feb. 27
6:37 p.m. French Guiana time
-
Success
13
USA
March 2
2:49:03 a.m. EST
Dragon-V2 (SpX-DM1)
Manned / unmanned test
Falcon-9-070 (B1051)
Cape Canaveral (KSC)
39A
A
Success
14
China
March 9
16:28:04.5408 UTC
Zhongxing-6C
Application / communications
Chang Zheng-3B/G2
Xichang
2
-
Success
15
March 14
22:14:08.175 Moscow Time
5
Success
16
USA
March 16
8:26:00.1 p.m. EDT
Wideband Global Satcom, WGS-10
Military / communications
Delta-4-Medium+ (5,4)
Cape Canaveral
37B
B
Success
17
Europe
March 21
22:50:35 French Guiana time
Prisma
Application / remote sensing
1
Success
18
China
March 27
17:39 Beijing Time
Lingque-1B (ZG6U)
Experimental
OS-M1 (Chongqing-Liangjiang Star)
Jiuquan
-
-
Failure
19
USA
March 28
-
R3D2
Experimental
Electron
Mahia
-
-
Success
20
China
March 31
15:51 UTC
Tianlian-2-01
Communications / Data relay
Chang Zheng-3B/E
Xichang
-
-
Success
21
India
April 1
9:30 Indian Standard Time
EMISat, Flock-4a-1 (Dove 2218), Flock-4a-2 (Dove 2201), Flock-4a-3 (Dove 2206), Flock-4a-4 (Dove 2220), Flock-4a-5 (Dove 2227), Flock-4a-6 (Dove 220B), Flock-4a-7 (Dove 222D), Flock-4a-8 (Dove 2213), Flock-4a-9 (Dove 2224), Flock-4a-10 (Dove 2205), Flock-4a-11 (Dove 2223), Flock-4a-12 (Dove 2209), Flock-4a 13 (Dove 220C), Flock-4a-14 (Dove 222C), Flock-4a-15 (Dove 2207), Flock-4a-16 (Dove 222B), Flock-4a-17 (Dove 2212), Flock-4a-18 (Dove 2215), Flock-4a-19 (Dove 2235), Flock-4a-20 (Dove 2232), Lemur-2-96, Lemur-2 -97, Lemur-2 -98, Lemur-2 -99, BlueWalker-1 (BW-1), M6P, Astrocast-0.2, AISTECHSAT-3 (Danu Pathfinder), AIS, APRS, ARIS
Application
PSLV-C45 (QL)
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
22
April 4
14:01:34.264 Moscow Time
Manned / cargo supply
6
Success
23
April 4
2:03:37 p.m. French Guiana time
Application / communications
-
Success
24
USA
April 12
22:35 UTC
Arabsat-6A
Application / communications
Falcon Heavy
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A
Success
25
USA
April 17
4:46 p.m EDT
Cygnus NG-11 (CRS-11, Roger Chaffee)
Manned / cargo supply
Wallops Isl.
LP-0A
A
Success
26
China
April 20
14:41 UTC
Beidou-3IGSO-1 (Beidou-44)
Application / navigation
Chang-Zheng-3B/G2
Xichang
3
-
Success
27
China
April 30
06:52:05.017 Beijing Time
Tianhui 2-01-1, Tianhui 2-01-2
Application / remote sensing
Chang Zheng-4B
Taiyuan
-
-
Success
28
USA
May 4
02:48 EDT
Dragon SpX-17 (CRS-17) OCO-3, STP-H6
Manned / cargo supply
Falcon-9-071 (B1056.1)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
29
USA
May 5
06:00 UTC
Harbinger, SPARC-1 (Space Plug and Play Architecture Research CubeSat-1), Falcon ODE (Falco Orbital Debris Experiment)
Military / Experimental
Electron
Mahia
1
-
Success
30
China
May 17
15:49 UTC
Beidou-2G8 (45)
Application / navigation
Chang Zheng-3C/G2 (Y16)
Xichang
2
-
Success
31
India
May 22
00:00 UTC
RISAT-2B
Application / remote sensing
PSLV-CA (C46)
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
32
China
May 23
06:49 Beijing Time
Yaogan-33
Military / radar reconnaisance
Chang Zheng-4C
Taiyuan
9
-
Failure
33
USA
May 23
10:30 p.m. Eastern Time
Starlink (1), Starlink (2), Starlink (3), Starlink (4), Starlink (5), Starlink (6), Starlink (7), Starlink (8), Starlink (9), Starlink (10), Starlink (11), Starlink (12), Starlink (13), Starlink (14), Starlink (15), Starlink (16), Starlink (17), Starlink (18), Starlink (19), Starlink (20), Starlink (21), Starlink (22), Starlink (23), Starlink (24), Starlink (25), Starlink (26), Starlink (27), Starlink (28), Starlink (29), Starlink (30), Starlink (31), Starlink (32), Starlink (33), Starlink (34), Starlink (35), Starlink (36), Starlink (37), Starlink (38), Starlink (39), Starlink (40), Starlink (41), Starlink (42), Starlink (43), Starlink (44), Starlink (45), Starlink (46), Starlink (47), Starlink (48), Starlink (49), Starlink (50), Starlink (51), Starlink (52), Starlink (53), Starlink (54), Starlink (55), Starlink (56), Starlink (57), Starlink (58), Starlink (59), Starlink (60)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 B1049.3
Cape Canaveral
SLC 40
-
Success
34
May 27
09:23 Moscow Time
Military / navigation
4
Success
35
May 30
20:42:00 Moscow Time
39
Success
36
China
June 5
12:06 local time
Jilin-1 Gaofen-3A, Bufeng-1A, Bufeng-1B, Xiaoxiang-1 (04), Tianqi-3 'Tao Xingzhi', Zhongdianwangtong-1A, Zhongdianwangtong-1B
Experimental
Chang Zheng-11
Yellow Sea
Floating platform
-
-
37
USA
June 12
-
Radarsat C-1, Radarsat C-2, Radarsat C-3
Application / remote sensing
Falcon-9
Vandenberg
-
-
Success
38
Europe
June 20
6:43 p.m. French Guiana
T-16, Eutelsat-7C
Application / communications
Ariane-5 ECA (VA248)
-
Success
39
China
June 24
18:09:04.518 UTC
Beidou-3 IGSO-2 (Beidou-46)
Military / navigation
Chang Zheng-3B
Xichang
3
-
Success
40
USA
June 25
2:30 a.m. EDT
Space Test Program-2 (STP-2)
Military / experimental
Falcon Heavy
Cape Canaveral
39A
A
Success
41
USA
June 29
04:30 UTC
Multiple payloads
Experimental
Electron
Mahia
-
-
Success
42
July 5
08:41:45.962 Moscow Time
Meteor-M No. 2-2, Momentus X1, NSLSat-1, Lemur-2 (100), Lemur-2 (101) Lemur-2 (102), Lemur-2 (103), Lemur-2 (104), Lemur-2 (105), Lemur-2 (106), Lemur-2 (107), Lemur-2 (108), JAISAT-1, EXOCONNECT, D-Star One (Lightsat), Lucky-7, SEAM-2.0, MTCube, SONATE, Beesat-9, Beesat-10, Beesat-11, Beesat-12, Beesat-13, MOVE-2b, TTU-100, Ecuador-UTE, ICEYE-X4, ICEYE-X5, DoT-1, MKA Sokrat, VDNKhA-80, AmurSat (AmGU-1)
Application / remote-sensing
-
Success
43
July 10
20:14 Moscow Time
Kosmos-2535, Kosmos-2536, Kosmos-2537, Kosmos-2538
4
Success
44
Europe
July 10
22:53:03 French Guiana time
Falcon Eye-1
Application / remote sensing
-
Failure
45
15:30:57 Moscow Time
Science / astronomy
24
Success

 

The 2019 space launch score card (as of July 18, 2019 ):

USA
China
Europe
India
Iran
Japan
World
Launch vehicles
Falcon-9: 6
Chang Zheng-3B/E: 5
Ariane-5: 2
PSLV: 3
Simorgh: 2*
Epsilon: 1
-
Electron: 3
Chang Zheng-11: 2
Vega: 2 (1*)
-
-
-
-
Delta-4: 2
OS-M1: 1*
         
Falcon Heavy: 2
Chang Zheng-4B: 1
         
Chang Zheng-3C: 1
           
Chang Zheng-4C: 1*
           
Total: 14
11
10
4
3
2
1
45
Failed: 0
2
0
1
0
2
0
5
Launch sites
Cape Canaveral: 7
Xichang: 4
Sriharikota: 3
Semnan: 2
Uchinoura: 1
-
Vandenberg: 3
Jiuquan: 2
-
-
-
-
-
Mahia, NZ: 3
Taiyuan: 2
         
Wallops Isl.: 1
Yellow Sea: 1
           

(1*) - number of failed launches

 

Planned Russian orbital launch attempts:

July 20, 19:28:21 Moscow Time: A Soyuz-FG rocket to launch a Soyuz MS-13 (No. 746) transport spacecraft from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. The crew will include the Russian cosmonaut Aleksandr Skvortsov, a European astronaut Luca Parmitano and NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan. Aboard the station, the trio will be a part of Expedition 60 and 61. The mission was first rescheduled from July 10 to July 24, before being advanced to July 6. As of beginning of 2019, the spacecraft was scheduled to remain in orbit for 215 days and return to Earth on Feb. 6, 2020, however by the beginning of February 2019, the landing was advanced to December 18 of the same year. At the beginning of April, the official decision was made to postpone the launch from July 6 to July 20. On May 14, the spacecraft was transported into the vacuum chamber at Site 254 in Baikonur for tests using a mixture of helium and air to ensure the absence of leaks in the ship's pressurized compartments. On July 1, solar panels of the spacecraft were exposed to an array of electric lights testing their ability to supply power.

On July 4, the primary and backup crews of the Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft traveled to Baikonur Cosmodrome for final training. The primary crew included the Russian cosmonaut Aleksandr Skvortsov, a European astronaut Luca Parmitano and NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan. The backup crew was comprised of Sergei Ryzhikov (Roskosmos), Tom Marshburn (NASA) and Soichi Noguchi (Japan). Next day, both teams worked inside the flight-worthy Soyuz MS-13 undergoing final preparations at the spacecraft processing building at Site 254. Cosmonauts and astronauts also tried on their Sokol spacesuits and checked them for air leaks. After completion of the familiarization training, Soyuz MS-13 was sent to fueling, which was completed on July 8 and, on the same day, the spacecraft was returned to Site 254 for final checks.

On July 10, the spacecraft was integrated with its launch vehicle adapter, and on July 12, it underwent its final visual inspection and on the same day it was rolled inside its payload fairing.

On July 16, the payload section with the spacecraft was transported to the vehicle assembly building at Site 112 and the next day, it was integrated with the Emergency Escape System, SAS, and the third stage of the Soyuz launch vehicle. The resulting upper composite was then transferred to the transporter/erector, where it was connected to the lower booster stages of the Soyuz rocket. Before the end of the day, the technical management and the State Commission gave the green light to the rollout of the vehicle to the launch pad at Site 1 on the morning of July 18, which proceeded as planned.

rollout

Soyuz MS-13 shortly after arrival at launch pad on July 18, 2019.


July 31, 15:10 Moscow Time: A Soyuz-2-1a to launch a Progress MS-12 cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. As of 2014, the launch was scheduled for July 1, 2018. The mission was later re-scheduled for June 5, 2019, and July 31, 2019. The launch was initially scheduled for 15:13 Moscow Time on July 31, but later adjusted for 15:10 Moscow Time to enable a two-orbit rendezvous with the station, concluding with docking at around 18:35 Moscow Time on the same day. On July 1, the specialists at the spacecraft processing building at Site 254 completed vacuum testing of the spacecraft and on July 8, they performed the final test of the ship's solar panels with their exposure to an array of electric lights.

progress

Solar panels of the Progress MS-12 spacecraft undergo testing on July 9, 2019.


August 6, 00:37 Moscow Time: A Proton-M rocket to launch the Blagovest No. 14L communications satellite for the Russian Ministry of Defense. As of August 2018, the launch was expected in the first quarter of 2019, but by the end of 2018, the mission slipped to May or June 2019. The launch on May 17 was initially targeted but by the end of March 2019, it was postponed until a period between May 24 and 25. By the middle of April, the mission was postponed to July 16 and by the end of June, it slipped to August 6.


August 22: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket (No. Ya15000-037) to launch the Soyuz MS-14 (Production No. 743; ISS mission 60S) transport spacecraft without crew from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS, to ceritfy the Soyuz 2-1a rocket for missions with humans onboard. Following the two-day trip to the station, Soyuz MS-14 will dock at the MIM-2 Poisk module, a part of the Russian Segment, on August 24, where the spacecraft will remain until September 3, when its Descent Module will return to Earth after a 12-day flight.

The Soyuz MS-14 mission was previously scheduled for liftoff on August 23 and Sept. 4, 2019. It was later planned for Sept. 12, 2019, but around January of that year, it was set for August 22. That launch date was re-confirmed by the official ISS flight manifest approved by Roskosmos on Feb. 25, 2019.

The preparations for the launch began in Baikonur on May 15, with the unloading of the booster stages of the Soyuz-2-1a rocket inside the vehicle assembly building at Site 31. The assembly of the launch vehicle began on June 7 with bolting together of the two sections comprasing the core booster of the second stage. In the next 24 hours, four boosters of the first stage were clustered around the core booster.

assembly

On June 7, 2019, specialists assembled two modules of the core stage for the Soyuz-2-1a rocket
slated to launch Soyuz MS-14.


Around September 15: A Proton-M/Briz-M rocket to launch from Baikonur with a pair of satellites built by Orbital ATK: Eutelsat-5 West-B and the first Mission Extension Vehicle, MEV-1. The Eutelsat-5 West B satellite is based on Orbital ATK's GEOstar platform and carries communications payload developed at Airbus Defense and Space. During its ride to orbit on the Proton, Eutelsat-5 West-B will be stacked on top of the MEV-1 satellite. The two-launch agreement between Eutelsat and the International Launch Services, ILS, which markets Proton rockets to commercial customers, was announced on October 12, 2016. The deal also included the first order for the yet-to-be developed Proton-Medium rocket to carry an unidentified payload for Eutelsat in 2019 or 2020. The agreements for both launches were pre-arranged in a preliminary deal between ILS and Eutelsat, first announced in October of 2015.

By July 2018, the mission had to be postponed from the the fourth quarter of 2018 to March 2019, until after the launch of the Yamal-601 satellite, due to delays with the delivery of Eutelsat and MEV satellites. Then, at the end of 2018, delays with the tests of the payload adapter required to postpone the mission until the second quarter of 2019. At the beginning of June, the RIA Novosti news agency quoted GKNPTs Khrunichev's spokesman as saying that the company "was ready to provide the launch of Eutelsat-5 West-B and MEV-1 spacecraft at the end of Summer 2019, in accordance with the customers' production and testing schedule." However, sources familiar with the real status of the payload told RussianSpaceWeb.com in the second half of June that the satellites had been projected for shipment to the launch site at the end of July, allowing to begin the launch campaign in Baikonur in early August 2019. Because of the dual payload on the mission, the Northrop Grumman team in Baikonur would need more time than the regular 25-day processing campaign at the launch site. As a result, the mission could not lift off before early September, industry sources said.

By the end of June, the Northrop Grumman was yet to finalize the arrangements for the shipment of the satellites to Baikonur, which could be delayed from the last week of July to the first week of August, in turn requiring shifting the launch date for the mission to a period after September 15.

mev

An artist rendering of the mission extension vehicle (left) approaching an aging satellite.


September 25: A Soyuz-FG rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-15 transport spacecraft (Production No. 744/ISS mission 61S) from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS.

The crew will include a yet-to-be-assigned Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka, a US astronaut Jessica Meir and a commercial passenger from the United Arab Emirates, UAE, Hazzaa Ali Almansoori.

As of the end of February 2019, Roskosmos was yet to get a final agreement with NASA about the potential use of one seat on the Soyuz MS-15 for a paid passenger. At the same time, Roskosmos needed to get NASA to agree to extend the mission of another US astronaut aboard the ISS to as long as one year, in order to free the return seat for a tourist on the Soyuz MS-12 spacecraft, which was scheduled for landing on Oct. 3, 2019.

According to an earlier plan, the commercial passenger from UAE would launch on April 5, 2019, aboard the Soyuz MS-12 spacecraft and, after a 10-day flight, hitchhike back to Earth the returning Soyuz MS-10 on April 15, 2019. However, the latter vehicle, which carried only two crew members, never made it to orbit due to a launch vehicle failure. In the meantime, two candidates from UAE began training at Star City in September 2018.

After the Soyuz MS-10 accident on Oct. 11, 2018, NASA re-confirmed its plans to add its second astronaut to the Soyuz MS-12 crew and thus leaving no free seats aboard the three-seat vehicle. As a result, the only other way to provide an extra seat for the returning space tourist would be bumping the return of one of the professional astronauts to another mission.

Moreover, according to the original schedule, the launch of Soyuz MS-15 was planned for Oct. 18, 2019, or after the planned departure of Soyuz MS-12 on October 3 after 203 days in space.

In order to overlap the two missions at the ISS, by the beginning of 2019, Roskosmos evaluated advancing the planned launch of Soyuz MS-15 to September 23 and, later, to September 25.

The September 25 launch date was formally confirmed in the official ISS flight manifest, which was approved by Roskosmos on Feb. 25, 2019. According to that document, Soyuz MS-15 was expected to remain in orbit for 187 days, implying the return to Earth on March 29, 2020. As an unintended consequence of three transport vehicles docked at the station simultaneously for eight days, the station's crew will reach nine people from Sept. 29 until October 3.


October: A Soyuz rocket to launch the Italian dual-purpose COSMO-SkyMed and European CHEOPS satellites from the ELS complex in Kourou, French Guiana.


November: A Soyuz-ST rocket to launch a cluster of 32 OneWeb Internet communications satellites from Baikonur.


Fourth quarter: Russia to launch the Ekspress-80 and Ekspress-103 communications satellites. The joint launch of two satellitew was originally promised in 2018, but as of 2016, the mission slipped to the fourth quarter of 2019. On Jan. 31, 2018, Roskosmos announced that the payload structure module for Ekspress-80 arrived to Rome from ISS Reshetnev and was undergoing acceptance checks at Thales Alenia Space Italy by a team of engineers including specialists from Reshetnev.


December 20: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket to launch a Progress MS-13 cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014, the launch was planned for Oct. 16, 2018. The launch was later planned for December 2.)


Uncertain dates

Postponed from fourth quarter of 2018: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket to launch a Neitron satellite from Plesetsk.


Delayed from May: A Rockot to launch a trio of Gonets-M communications satellites, a pair of Blits-M experimental satellites and the Radio-2017 experimental satellite from Plesetsk. The primary payload was originally planned for launch as early as 2016 and, in case of unavailability of the Rokot, could fly on the Soyuz-2-1v rocket. The mission was later postponed from the Fall of 2016, the third quarter of 2017 and October 2018


2019 (?): A Zenit-3SLB/Fregat-SB to launch the Ukrainian Lybid communications satellite from Baikonur.

When first announced in 2006, the Lybid spacecraft was expected to fly in 2010, but it was later postponed until September 2011. In April 2010, the launch was promised in April 2012. However, according to the Yuzmash production plant in Dnipro, Ukraine, it received an order for the Zenit rocket to launch Lybid in 2011. In the meantime, the mission was delayed until the fourth quarter of 2013. In August 2014, Ukrainian space agency said that the spacecraft would be ready for launch in the fourth quarter of that year, however political problems between Russia and Ukraine kept the spacecraft on the ground.

Only in March 2017, there were first signs that the Lybid program might have a chance to get off the ground. In an interview with the Interfax-Ukraine news agency, Acting Head of Ukrainian Space Agency, GKAU, Yuri Radchenko said that before the end of that month, the Yuzhmash factory in Dnepr, Ukraine, was expected to pay Moscow-based NPO Energomash for the RD-171 engine to be installed on the fully assembled first stage of the Zenit rocket slated to launch Lybid. At the same time, industry sources said that personnel at Yuzhmash had began testing a fully assembled second stage of the Zenit for the Lybid mission.

As of September 2017, the launch of the Lybid satellite was postponed from the end of the year to the first quarter of 2018. Within a month, the launch date was narrowed down to the Jan. 1-10, 2018, period. However on Jan. 11, 2018, Yuzmash announced that it had been waiting for $8.245 million to complete the manufacturing of the Zenit rocket for the mission, which was now officially under an order from the TsENKI launch infrastructure center, a division of the Roskosmos State Corporation. By taking the formal ownership of the launcher, TsENKI, likely provided a political cover for the Lybid launch, necessary under the conditions of mutual sanctions between Moscow and Kiev. As of February 2018, it was unclear whether the satellite could be launched before the end of the year.


2019: A Soyuz rocket with a Fregat upper stage to launch the second pair of a quartet of satellites to study plasma within the Roy ("Swarm") project from Plesetsk. Each 200-kilogram spacecraft would be based on the Karat platform with plasma-electric engines and carry around 60 kilograms of payload. The scientific payload would be based on the Strannik experiment. (612). Each spacecraft would carry a single magnitometer boom and four booms for measurement of the magnetic field.


2019: Russia to launch the Okean No. 1 ocean-monitoring satellite. (As of 2010-2012)


2019: A Soyuz-2-1v/Volga rocket to launch six Gonets-M1 satellites (No. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) from Plesetsk. (As of 2014. As of 2013, the launch was expected as early as 2017.)


Postponed from third quarter of 2018: A Soyuz-2-1b rocket to launch a modified Progress M-UM space tug with the Node Module, UM, to the International Space Station.


Unrealized missions

2019: An Angara rocket to fly its first mission from a newly completed launch pad in Vostochny Cosmodrome, possibly with an unmanned prototype of the PTK NP spacecraft. (A statement by the head of TsNIIMash research institute Gennady Raikunov on December 3, 2012, promised the first launch of PTK NP on Angara in 2018.)

Uncertain launch dates

Postponed from June 2018: A Rockot/Briz-KM booster to launch the Geo-IK-2 No. 13L geodesic satellite for the Russian Ministry of Defense from Pad 3 at Site 133 in Plesetsk. (As of 2016, the mission was promised in 2017. Then planned between June and December 2018.)


Delayed from 2018: A Proton-M/Block DM-03 rocket to launch a trio of GLONASS-M navigation satellites (No. 56, 57, 58) from Baikonur. (Postponed from 2014, beginning of 2015, May 2015 and 1st quarter of 2017.)


Delayed from 2018: A Soyuz-2.1 rocket with a Fregat upper stage to launch first of four second-generation Meridian satellites for military communications. (As of 2016)


Delayed from 2018: A Rockot booster to launch the Geo-RG geodesic satellite.


After 2017: Soyuz rockets to launch SAR-Lupe-2 observation satellites. (As of September 2012)


End of 2018: Soyuz-2-1b rocket to launch an eight-ton OKA-T-MKS No. 1 (52KS) free-flyer module from Vostochny to be serviced from ISS during its five-year mission. The spacecraft would be used for research in the field of nanoelectronics, alloys, composite materials and biotechnology. (459) The launch was originally planned for 2015, however by fall 2011, it had to be postponed to 2017-2018, due to lack of potential customers. (521) In April 2013, the launch was promised at the end of 2018. (634)


Delayed from 2018: An Angara-1.2 rocket to fly its first mission with Gonets-M satellites from Site 35 in Plesetsk. (As of 2016).


Postponed from 2017:

End of 2017: A Proton rocket to launch the Yamal-501 communications satellite from Baikonur.


Third quarter: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M to launch GLONASS-K1 No. 13 (Block K3s) navigation satellite from Plesetsk. The launch was postponed from 2016.


Fourth quarter: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M to launch GLONASS-K1 No. 14 (Block K4s) navigation satellite from Plesetsk. The launch was postponed from 2016.


Third quarter: A Rockot/Briz-KM vehicle to launch the first Gonets-M1 satellite from Plesetsk.


2017: A Proton rocket to launch the 5th trio of GLONASS-K1 navigation satellites (No. 15, 16 and 17/Block K5) from Baikonur.


2017: Russia to launch first GLONASS-KM navigation satellites. Launched in pairs on Angara/Briz-M rockets or one by one on Soyuz-2/Fregat rockets.


2017: Russia to launch the Kartograf-OE No. 1 remote-sensing satellite. (Before 2012, the launch was expected as early as 2014).


Postponed from 2015:

End of 2015 - end of 2016: A Soyuz or Vega rocket to launch the 200-kilogram Taranis satellite into a quasi-sun-synchronous orbit with an altitude of 700 kilometers. Developed by the French space agency, CNES, the Taranis satellite (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiation from lightNIng and Sprites) will be a secondary payload during a mission to deliver multiple spacecraft. The satellite will study magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere coupling via transient processes, focusing in particular on two aspects: determining the characteristics and frequency of transient luminous events (TLE) involved in the coupling between the ionosphere and atmosphere, and characterizing the electron beams accelerated from the atmosphere to the magnetosphere. The contract for the mission between Toulouse Space Center and Arianespace was announced on July 9, 2012. The agreement also included options for the launch of two other CNES satellites, Microscope and Merlin.

Postponed from 2015: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a Pion-NKS electronic intelligence satellite from Plesetsk. (As of 2014.)

Postponed from 2015: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a cluster of Globalstar satellites from Baikonur. (As of March 2013)

Postponed from 2015: Soyuz rocket to launch the Foton-M No. 5 spacecraft. The spacecraft is expected to be equipped with solar panels, modified service module, and the new liquid-propellant orbit correction engine. The orbital life span of the satellite to be launched into the 400-450-kilometer orbit was expected to increase to 60 days. (As of April 2009)

Postponed from around 2015: Russia to launch Kosmos-SKh satellite to monitor agricultural development from space.

Postponed from 2015: Russia to launch the Kartograf-OE No. 2 remote-sensing satellite.

Postponed from 2015: A Rockot booster to make three flights with military payloads from Pad 3 at Site 133 in Plesetsk. (As of middle of 2014)


Postponed from 2016:

2016: A Soyuz-2-1b rocket to launch the second satellite for the EKS early-warning constellation from Plesetsk. (As of December 2015)

2016: A Rockot booster to launch its final military payload from Plesetsk.

2016: Angara-1.2 to fly its first test mission from Plesetsk.

2016: Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-SB rocket to launch the Arkon-2M No. 2 remote-sensing satellites for all-weather radar observations of the Earth surface from a 550-600-kilometer Sun-synchronous orbit. In 2010, a pair of spacecraft was scheduled for launch in 2013, however by 2012, the first Arkon-2M was expected to fly in 2015 and the second in 2016. The Arkon-2M program was canceled by November 2012.


Canceled Russian missions

Aug. 5: A Dnepr rocket to launch a pair of GRACE-FO scientific satellites for the European Space Agency, ESA, from a silo facility 370/13 in Dombarovsky. The mission was switched to a Falcon-9 rocket.

2017: Russia to launch Arkon-2 No. 1 radar remote-sensing satellite. As of 2008, the first launch of Arkon-2 was promised in 2011 (299), however during 2010-2012 period, the mission was expected in 2017.

2017: The Baiterek launch complex in Baikonur to host its first mission of the Angara rocket. (As of end of 2010. As of 2008, the first Angara mission from Baikonur was promised in 2012; by 2009, it slipped to 2014 and by 2011 to 2017. The program was canceled in 2012).

2017-2018: A Soyuz rocket with a Fregat upper stage to launch the first pair of a quartet of satellites from Plesetsk to study plasma within the Roy ("Swarm") project. Each 200-kilogram spacecraft would be based on the Karat platform with plasma-electric engines and carry around 60 kilograms of payload. Each spacecraft would carry a single magnetometer boom and four booms for measurement of Earth's electric field.

2017: Russia to launch Smotr-R No. 1 remote-sensing satellite.

2018: An Angara-5 rocket to launch the TEM-1 experimental, nuclear-powered, electrically propelled space tug from Vostochny.


This page is compiled by Anatoly Zak; Last update: July 18, 2019

Page editor: Alain Chabot; Last edit: April 30, 2011

All rights reserved

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