Soyuz-1 to rockets home

HOME
ROCKETS
SPACECRAFT
CENTERS
PEOPLE
CHRONOLOGY
TwitterFacebook

Site news

Site map

About this site

About the author

Testimonials

ADVERTISE!

Mailbox

DONATE!


Searching for details:

Author of this page will appreciate comments, corrections and imagery related to the subject. Please contact Anatoly Zak.


Site news | Site map | About this site | About the author | Testimonials | Mailbox | ADVERTISE! | DONATE!

Book

SIGN UP FOR A REPRINT!

Angara-5 to fly its maiden mission

The first space rocket developed in the post-Soviet Russia finally flies

SPECIAL REPORT

Written and illustrated by Anatoly Zak; Editor: Alain Chabot

Silo

Above: Angara family as of 2013, left to right: Angara-5, Angara-5P, Angara-3, Angara-1.2.


Below: Capabilities of the Angara family (as of June 2009):

-
Liftoff mass
149.0 tons
171.0 tons
481.0 tons
759.0 - 773.0 tons
1,133.0 tons
Payload to low Earth orbit*
2.0 tons
3.5 - 3.8 tons
14.6 - 15.1 tons
24.5 - 25.8 tons
35.0 tons
Payload to geostationary transfer orbit, GTO**
-
-
2.4**** - 3.6*** tons
7.5 tons***
-
Payload to geostationary orbit
-
-
1.0**** - 1.6*** tons
3.0**** - 4.5***
-
Total length
34.9 meters
42.2 meters
46.7 meters
48.7 meters
59.14 meters

*Altitude 200 kilometers, Inclination 63.1 degrees; **Perigee 500 kilometers, inclination 25 degrees; ***when using KVSK/KVTK upper stage; ****when using Briz-M stage

ANGARA'S HISTORY: 20 YEARS IN THE MAKING

From the publisher: Please help to keep this site open and current! The pace of our development depends primarily on the level of support from our readers.

Original

Angara is born in the wreckage of the USSR

In 1992, in the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Russian government called for the creation of the new space booster, which would be built and launched within the Russian Federation, ending the country's dependency on the hardware and launch sites of the newly independent republics of the former USSR.

 
Development

Building Angara

Despite the strategic importance of the Angara project, it remained on the drawing board for most of the 1990s. The active development of the rocket and of its launch pad in Plesetsk started picking up pace only by the mid-2000s. However, even with improved funding, numerous technical and organizational problems plagued the project.

1

Preparing for the first launch

In November 2013, a full-scale prototype of the Angara launch vehicle finally made it to the launch pad at Russia's northern launch site in Plesetsk. It was a major milestone in the long-delayed development of the vehicle then scheduled to make its maiden flight in May 2014.

1

Angara completes its maiden mission

Following an aborted launch attempt on June 27, 2014, a custom-built Angara-1.2PP rocket completed a successful suborbital mission on July 9, 2014.

Angara-5

First Angara-5 mission

At the beginning of 2014, the first launch of the Angara-5 rocket was officially promised before the end of the year. Flight testing of Angara rockets was expected to continue until 2020.

ANGARA FAMILY: REAL AND IMAGINED

Angara-1

Angara-1

The Angara-1 would be the lightest version the Angara family of launch vehicles. In turn, several variations of Angara-1 were considered during the development, however currently only one configuration is scheduled to fly operational missions.

 

Angara-3

Angara-3

Angara-3 would use a pair of standard URM-1 boosters as the first stage and a very similar second-stage booster. The URM-2 stage would serve as the third stage, enabling the rocket to deliver up to 15 tons to the low Earth orbit. Despite its feasibility, this version was not scheduled to fly as of 2014.

Angara-5

Angara-5

Angara-5 would use four standard URM-1 boosters as the first stage and a single URM-1 as its second stage. The URM-2 would serve as the third stage, enabling the rocket to deliver up to 25 tons to the low Earth orbit. Angara-5 was expected to be the main workhorse of the Russian space program, replacing the veteran Proton rocket.

5P

Angara-5P

A modified version of the Angara-5 designed to carry manned spacecraft became known as Angara-5P. It is officially scheduled to lift off for the first time from the Vostochny cosmodrome in 2018.

Angara

Angara-7

A proposed Angara-7 would use six standard URM-1 boosters and custom-built core stage, delivering up to 35 tons of payload to low Earth orbit. The project did not go beyond paper studies and scale models.

Angara

Angara-100

A new launch-vehicle proposed at GKNPTs Khrunichev in 2005 was designated Angara-100, denoting its ability to deliver a 100-ton payload into the low Earth orbit. It has never been built, but provided a foundation for later studies of super-heavy rockets in Russia.

KSLV

South-Korean KSLV project

In March 2002, GKNPTs Khrunichev started negotiations with South-Korean representatives on the joint development of the first launch vehicle for Korean Aerospace Research Institute, KARI. in 2009, the Korean Satellite Launch Vehicle, or KSLV, lifted off for the first time using a Russian-built first stage based on the Angara's design.

USER'S GUIDE TO ANGARA
downrange

NEW, Dec. 21: Angara-5's flight profile

During its first test launch, Angara-A5 is expected to demonstrate its ability to deliver cargo into geostationary orbit 36,000 kilometers above the Equator, the destination for most communications satellites. However, the maiden mission will only carry a payload simulator, rather than an operational spacecraft.

 
URM-1

First stage, URM-1

The first stage of the Angara launch vehicle is known as URM-1, which stands for the Universal Rocket Module No. 1. The URM-1 standard module serves as the first-stage booster for all versions of the Angara family of space launchers.

URM-2

Second stage, URM-2

The second stage of the Angara launch vehicle is known as URM-2, which stands for Universal Rocket Module No. 2. According to original plans, URM-2 stage was supposed to be used o]n both types of the Angara launch vehicles approved for development -- Angara-1 and Angara-5.

KVTK

KVTK to give Angara power of hydrogen

Although the first stage boosters of the Angara rocket would be fueled by the traditional combination of liquid oxygen and kerosene, Russian engineers promised to equip the upper stages of the rocket with engines burning two cryogenicaly cooled components -- liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen.

Baikal

Baikal booster stage

In cooperation with KB Salyut, the developer of the Buran orbiter, Khrunichev conceived a reusable flyback booster rocket, which could serve as an alternative first stage in the Angara family. Designated Baikal, after a Siberian lake, the reusable booster was developed in parallel with the work on more traditional "booster modules."

Briz-M

Briz-M upper stage

To deliver communications satellites and other payloads into the hard-to-reach geostationary orbit 36,000 kilometers away from Earth, Angara-3 and Angara-5 rockets could be equipped with a Briz-M upper stage borrowed without much change from the Proton-M rocket.

RD-191

RD-191

The first-stage boosters of the Angara rocket are powered by the RD-191 engine built at NPO Energomash in Moscow. Equipped with a single combustion chamber, the RD-191 is derived from the four-chamber RD-170 engine developed during the 1980s.

RD-0124

RD-0124A engine

Originally developed for the third stage of the Soyuz-2 rocket, a modified version of the RD-0124 engine, designated RD-0124A was customized for the URM-2 stage of the Angara rocket. Final tests of the engine took place in the summer of 2013 clearing it for flight on the first Angara rocket.

to RD-0146

RD-0146

In 1997, the KBKhA design bureau in Voronezh started work on an engine with a thrust of 10 tons and equipped with a nozzle extension for best performance at high altitude. The engine would be intended for the KVRB upper stage, which one day could fly on Angara rockets.

LAUNCH PADS FOR ANGARA
Angara

Plesetsk

From the outset of the program, the Russian military intended to build the primary launch complex for the Angara rocket in Plesetsk, at the site originally intended for the Zenit rocket but abandoned after Zenit production was left in the newly independent republic of Ukraine.

 
Baiterek

Baiterek

In 2004, Russia and Kazakhstan reached an agreement to build a launch complex for the heavy version of the Angara rocket in Baikonur. However after years of planning, the two sides have never been able to agree on terms for the implementation of the project.

Vostochny

Vostochny

Provisional plans to launch Angara from the Svobodny Cosmodrome in the Russian Far East were made in 1994 but had to be put on hold for almost two decades. Only in 2011, did Roskosmos revisit the idea of bringing Angara to what became the Vostochny cosmodrome. Deploying Angara in Vostochny would make the Baiterek pad in Kazakhstan unnecessary.

Angara-1PP

to Origins of Sputnik to Sputnik-3 to ground control to Sputnik preparations to People behind Sputnik section to Sputnik rocket to Sputnik aftermath to Sputnik design