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In 2002, Russia conducted 19 orbital launch attempts versus 25 a year ago. Two missions failed due to the failure of the Soyuz and Proton launch vehicles. In contrast, all orbital launch attempts in 2001 were successful.

During 2002, total 21 spacecraft were launched into orbit onboard Russian rockets, including 13 Russian satellites or manned spacecraft. Two satellites never made it to orbit due to launch vehicle failures.


Record for 2001: Total 36 spacecraft were delivered into orbit, of which 29 were Russian-built satellites and seven were foreign payloads. This was much lower rate of commercial launch activities comparing to the year 2000, when Russia conducted as many as 20 commercial launches. Entering year 2001, the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, Rosaviacosmos, hoped to conduct as many as 12 commercial launches. However, a number of missions, including launches of the Proton and Dnepr-1 boosters, had to be delayed due to technical problems or lack of customers. As a result, Russia's revenues from commercial launch activities were not expected to exceed $300 million in 2001, comparing to $880 million produced in 2000.

During 2001, total four Western communications satellites had been launched, along with small payloads for Swedish, Moroccan and Pakistani customers. Baikonur remained a busiest launch site of the Russian space program with total 16 launches originating in Kazakhstan. Plesetsk hosted five launches and one rocket was launched from Svobodny.

The Russian military increased its space assets by 13 spacecraft, among them four navigation satellites, six communications satellites, one imaging reconnaissance spacecraft, one early-warning spacecraft in the geostationary orbit and one Navy electronic intelligence spacecraft.

The Soyuz and Molniya launchers had flown 11 times, of which seven launches were dedicated to the manned space program, including one to support Mir and six to build and maintain the International Space Station. A small Docking Compartment was added to the Russian portion of the International Space Station. No other permanent elements are expected to join the Russian segment of the station until 2004, the earliest.

The Proton rocket (including a brand-new Proton-M version) had flown six times, delivering six federal payloads and two foreign commercial comsats. This is a far cry from record-breaking 14 launches conducted in the previous year.

The Zenit launcher had flown three successful missions, including two from Sea Launch platform and one from Baikonur.

The Tsyklon-3 rocket returned to flight in July, after a failure in December 2000, and made two successful missions from Plesetsk, the Tsyklon-2 flown one mission from Baikonur.

Start and Cosmos-3M rockets had flown a single mission each. One launch of the Dnepr-1 booster with a cluster of commercial payloads planned for 2001 did not take place due to lack of customers.


Foreign launches

January 3, 12:15Z The Chinese CZ-1 ballistic missile failed after a suborbital launch from Wuzhai (China).


Orbital launch attempts in 2002:

Date
Local time
GMT
Spacecraft
Launcher
Launch site
Launch pad
Mission
Jan. 15
7:30 p.m. EST
-
Milstar 5
Titan 4B (B-38)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
Military communications
Jan. 23
-
23:47
Insat 3C
Ariane 42L
Kourou
ELA-2
Comsat
Feb. 4
-
02:45

MDS-1

DASH

H-2A
Tanegashima
Yoshinobu

Demo sat

Reentry capsule

Feb. 5
3:58 EST
20:58

HESSI*

Pegasus XL
Cape Canaveral
L-1011

Solar research

Feb. 11**
9:43 a.m. Pacific
17:43

Iridium (5)

Delta 2
Vandenberg
SLC-2W

Cellular telephony

Feb. 21
7:43 a.m. EST
12:43

Echostar-7

Atlas 3B
Cape Canaveral
36B

Communications

Feb. 23
1:59 a.m. EST
06:59

Intelsat 904

Ariane 44L
Kourou
ELA-2

Communications

Feb. 25
20:26
17:26

Cosmos-2387 (Yantar-4K2 ?)

Soyuz-U
Plesetsk
-

Surveillance

Feb. 28/29
-
01:07

Envisat

Ariane 511
Kourou
ELA-3

Remote sensing

March 1
XX:XX
XX:XX

Shuttle Columbia

Columbia
Cape Canaveral
-

HST servicing

March 8
05:59 EST
-

TDRS-I

Atlas 2A
Cape Canaveral
36A

Relay

March 17
-
-

GRACE (Tom)

GRACE (Jerry)

Rockot
Plesetsk
133

Science

March 20
01:28 Moscow
-

Colibri-2000

Soyuz/Progress M1-7
Baikonur
1

Science

March 22
01:13
-

Progress M1-8

Soyuz
Baikonur
1

ISS support

March 25
-
14:15

Shenzhou-3

Long March 2F
Jiuquan
-

Prototype of a manned spacecraft

March 29
-
01:29

JCSAT-8

Astra 3A

Ariane 44L
Kourou
ELA-2

Communications

March 30
-
17:25

Intelsat-903

Proton/Block DM
Baikonur
81/23

Communications

April 2
02:07 Moscow
-

Cosmos (Oko)

Molniya-M
Plesetsk
-

Early-warning

April 8
-
-

Shuttle

Atlantis
Cape Canaveral
-

0S trus delivery

April 16
-
23:02

NSS-7

Ariane 44L
Kourou
ELA-2

Communications

April 25
-
-

Soyuz TM-34

Soyuz
Baikonur
1

ISS CRV

May 10
-
-

DirecTV

Proton
Baikonur
81/24

Comsat

May 28
-
-

Cosmos-2389

Cosmos-3
Plesetsk
-

Navigation

June 5
-
-

Endeavour STS-111

Shuttle
Cape Canaveral
-

ISS

June 10
-
-

Express-A1R

Proton
Baikonur
-

Comsat

June 26
-
-

Progress M-46

Soyuz
Baikonur
-

ISS

July 25
-
-
Proton
Baikonur
-

Reconsat/Remote sensing

Aug. 22
-
-

Echostar-8

Proton
Baikonur
-

Comsat

Sept. 25
-
-

Progress M1-9

Soyuz
Baikonur
-

ISS

Oct. 7
-
-

Atlantis STS-112

Shuttle
Cape Canaveral
-

ISS

Oct. 15
-
-

Foton M-1

Soyuz-U (failed)
Plesetsk
-

Science

Oct. 17
-
-

Integral

Proton
Baikonur
-

Gamma-ray astronomy

Oct. 30
-
-

Soyuz TMA-1

Soyuz
Baikonur
1

ISS

Nov. 23
-
-

Endeavour STS-113

Shuttle
Cape Canaveral
-

ISS

Nov. 26
-
-

Astra-1K

Proton (failed)
Baikonur
81/23

Comsat

Nov. 28
-
-

AlSat (DMS)

Mozhaets

Cosmos-3
Plesetsk
-

Remote sensing

Experimental

Dec. 11
-
-

-

Arian-5 (failed)
Kourou
-

Comsats

Russian Space Forces launched a military satellite on Tuesday from their Northern Cosmodrome in Plesetsk. A four-stage Molniya-M rocket blasted off at 02:07 Moscow Time on April 2 and ten minutes later successfully delivered a classified military payload, most likely Oko-type early-warning satellite, to the initial Earth orbit.

*High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

**Delayed four times since Feb. 8

Jan. 25: India tested the Agni ballistic missile.

 

*This table lists Moscow time unless stated otherwise. Baikonur's local time is two hours ahead of Moscow Time. **UTC - Universal Standard Time